Life › Human interest

Cameroon: HRW urges Ambazonia leaders to keep tight rein on fighters

(c) copyright

Human Right Watch has enjoined Ambazonia leaders to instruct their fighters to end the violence committed on civilians in the North West and South West regions of Cameroon.

In a report published earlier today, the Organisation blames Separatist fighters for a number of crimes committed on the population of the two English speaking regions especially before the February 9 twin polls and urges their leaders to call them to order.

“Armed separatists in Cameroon’s Anglophone regions kidnapped over 100 people, burned property, and threatened voters in the period before the February 9, 2020 elections.” Part of the report reads.

“Separatist leaders should issue clear instructions to their fighters to end their crimes against civilians…” Lewis Mudge, Central Africa director at Human Rights Watch said.

According to Human Right Watch their attacks targeted those willing to participate in the legislative and municipal elections, be it candidates, election officials, activists, or citizens.

“The targets included members and supporters of the Social Democratic Front (SDF) party, which the separatists accuse of failing to show solidarity with their cause.”

Separatist fighters are equally accused of having burned down at least three ELECAM’s offices in Masaje, Babessi in the North West region and in Tombel, South West region.

In a bit to frustrate the holding of the February 9, 2020 Municipal and Legislative elections, the fighters issued a seven-day lockdown, threatening those who will temper to partake in the elections in the two regions.

Human Right Watch says that as a result, not all those who wished to cast their vote were able to do so in peace and security.

For over three years, Separatist fighters have been battling with Cameroon’s security forces in the two English speaking regions of the country in a crisis that has claimed some three thousand lives, forced 679,000 people to flee their homes, and left 600,000 children without education.



Featured
Back top