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Cameroon launches second phase of biodiversity conservation project

The TRIDOM II project ha been launched (c)All rights reserved

The second phase of the Integrated and Transborder Conservation of Biodiversity in the Basins of the Republic of Cameroon, TRIDOM II has been launched.

The project was launched on Tuesday December 19 in Sangmelima by the Ministry of Forestry and Wildlife in partnership with the United Nations Development Program.

The project seeks to reinforce the conservation of global endangered species in Cameroon by improving on the implementation of biodiversity laws, resilience with focus on the Cameroon borders while liaising with Gabon and Congo.

The TRIDOM that spans across Dja-Odzala-Minkébé is financed by the Global Environment Fund with the first phase put in place from 2009 to 2015.

« The region is vastly rich with endangered species mammals that need to be protected reason why the government of Cameroon gives maximum value to the launch of the second phase of this project, » the Secretary General of the Ministry of Forestry and wildlife Nyongwen Joseph said while launching the project in Sangmelima.

Stakeholders say the project will help in biodiversity surveillence as well as the exploitation of resources and will contribute in poverty reduction due to the ability for communities to manage their resources.

« This second phase is aligned on the global wildlife integrated program which is not only focused on elephants, gorrillas but also focused on the type of support we can provide to the local communities at the national as well as regional level, » Dr. Martin Zeh-Nlo Head of Unit for Sustainable conservation at the United Nations Development Programme said.

Another major innovation of the second phase of the project is the collaboration of other partners like the Ministry of Defence and local and traditional authorities, Dr. Zeh added.

During the first phase of the project, poaching was reduced at least 10 percent while endangered species were protected from extinction in the Cameroonian forests thanks to efforts put in place to identify and develop five protected zones and the creation of a wildlife management committee.

 

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